Home South Africa Motsoaledi denies the government’s reluctance to engage in electoral reform

Motsoaledi denies the government’s reluctance to engage in electoral reform

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Motsoaledi on Monday proposed the creation of a panel of experts to study and advise the government on electoral reform options early in the new year, but its work will not be completed until the next election.

Home Affairs Minister Aaron Motsoaledi at a media briefing on 25 October 2021. Photo: GCIS.

CAPE TOWN – Home Affairs Minister Aaron Matsoaledi says it is not true that the government is reluctant to implement electoral reforms.

READ: Motsoaledi proposes changes to Electoral Bill

But he again told parliament there was simply not enough time to make changes before the 2024 election.

Motsoaledi on Monday proposed the creation of a panel of experts to study and advise the government on electoral reform options early in the new year, but its work will not be completed until the next election.

Parliament is currently aiming to meet the December 10 deadline set by the Constitutional Court to make arrangements for independent candidates to run in the next national and provincial elections.

READ: Home Secretary proposes independent panel to review electoral system

The National Council of Provinces Committee on Security and Justice is considering four changes to the Electoral Amendment Bill, which was passed by the National Assembly last month.

This includes a formal commitment by the Electoral Reform Advisory Group to report to the Home Secretary within 12 months of the next election.

Motsoaledi responded to criticism that the government had ignored previous reports on electoral reform.

READ MORE: Parliament slows down on electoral reform, DA suggests

“Even if the van Zyl Slabbert report or the Kgalema Motlanthe report had been carried out, this new nation movement case would still have gone to court because we would still have a parliament where people go by constituencies, but political parties fight it “, said Motsaaledi.

Nine people with expertise in electoral and constitutional law will be selected to form an advisory group on electoral law reform, which will study public opinion before making recommendations to parliament.

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