According to Reds coach Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool and Manchester City have the same problem.

Klopp says the clubs have similar problems in attack with the signings of Erling Haaland and Darwin Nunes.

Manchester City’s Erling Haaland, whose signing looks to be even better business than last season’s British record £100m signing for Jack Grealish. Photo: Backpagepix.

Liverpool and Manchester City suffer from the same problem with strikers

Haaland and Núñez are a different breed of striker and have their own unique attacking approach which Klopp says teams will have to get used to.

Darwin Nunez
Darwin Nunes of Liverpool celebrates after scoring a 0-3 goal during the pre-season international friendly soccer match between RB Leipzig and FC Liverpool in Leipzig, Germany, July 21, 2022. Photo: EPA/CLEMENS BILAN

“(The city) has the same problem as us – they’re not used to Erling’s natural tracks, and we’re not used to Darwin’s natural tracks yet,” Klopp said.

“When Darwin offers the run, we keep giving him the ball, which doesn’t help because often the guy who stretches the opposition creates space between the lines.

“I’m pretty sure they’ll need time for Erling, but that doesn’t mean he can’t score already, like he did against Bayern.”

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Klopp says Liverpool want to use their near misses last term as motivation to do better this time around.

“Both teams (Liverpool and City) are playing at an incredibly high level and one thing makes the difference, like one goal in the Champions League final,” Klopp reflected.

“That’s part of the deal. This could happen at the end of the season with points tallied. It didn’t drive me crazy, and it didn’t drive the players either. Because that’s part of the deal. We can use this to become even more determined.”

Early start

On Saturday, Liverpool will face Manchester City in the Community Shield, the match will be played at the King Power Stadium, and Wembley will be the final of the Women’s Euro.

Both coaches have been critical of the schedule and feel they are being made to pay a high price for success.

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